Monthly Archives:September 2019

Pilates During Pregnancy 30 Sep

Pilates During Pregnancy

We Discuss ‘Pilates During Pregnancy”

I am SO excited to be part of this SPECIALTY class for Dynamic Pilates TV!! The “Pilates and Pregnancy” Workout is what I consider, “an educational class.” It is not a full flow, nor super challenging. I put it together to talk about concepts that are important when working with the pregnant client, and can be adapted to other pilates apparatus, class flow, or mat work.

Exercise is highly recommended during pregnancy, and pilates is a safe and effective mode of exercise to work on core and postural strength and overall strength and mobility during pregnancy.

Most national pregnancy associations and obstetrics guidelines recommend 30 min of exercise most days of the week. ALWAYS A GOOD RULE OF THUMB TO DOUBLE CHECK WITH YOUR DOCTOR/OB-GYN to double check and monitor throughout your pregnancy, if there is any reason that you should not continue exercise.

If your client is experiencing a pain or issue, have her discuss with her MD, and if needed have her see a Physical Therapist who specializes in women’s health, to help guide her.

EXERCISE SHOULD BE STOPPED IF: shortness of breath, headache, chest pain, bleeding, leakage, contraction, decreased fetal movement, or instructed by MD.

As a pilates instructor we create relationships with our clients and they grow to trust us. We also have friends and family who will seek out our advice. With this said, often a woman may talk to you BEFORE she gets pregnant curious about pilates. This is VALUABLE, I recommend that women start pilates and/or a regular exercise program, before they get pregnant. This way, the are familiar with the exercises, have the initial strength, and can more easily modify and adapt through pregnancy. I know that I PERSONALLY have been made aware of client’s pregnancy earlier than their family so WE can WORK TOGETHER to make a safe plan for her.

It is always good to be aware of your client throughout the class and educate them. I always tell my pregnancy clients to bring water and a snack to class, just incase they need it to maintain blood sugar. Additionally, to pace themselves and if anything doesn’t feel comfortable, let me know. Since women during pregnancy can have higher body temps, if possible, position them near a window, fan, or doorway.

Typically around 20 weeks you will want to limit time in supine (on the back), laying on prone (on the stomach, and may be earlier due to client comfort), and begin to modify exercises. Remember the GOAL is to maintain healthy exercise throughout pregnancy, let’s not cause issues that we don’t need to. My RULE OF THUMB…. even if my client CAN, does she need to. As the abdominal muscles lengthen and other physiologic changes are occurring, the ability to
stabilize decreased, and the muscles loose their length-tension relationship. PLEASE reassure your client that just because she DOESN’T do a full plank or teaser for 40 weeks of pregnancy doesn’t mean she won’t get her strength back after. There are SO MANY ways to modify!!!

OVERALL, working with the pregnant population is SO rewarding!!! It is fun to be part of their journey and keep women healthy!! Enjoy the class and let us know what else you would like to see!!!

Starting Your Own Pilates Studio 23 Sep

Starting Your Own Pilates Studio

So you’ve trained up or you’ve been teaching for other people for years. And now it’s time to take the plunge and open your own business!

If you’re going to open your own studio then you should know that you will need to widen your skills set, as this will require much more than just being a good teacher. Opening my studio was one of the best things I ever did, but it’s not for everyone and it can bring stress at times!

Here’s a few things to think about before you take the plunge:

Location, Location, Location

Above all, I would say this is up there with one of the most important things to consider. Somewhere easily visible, that gives you access to passing trade will make your job a hell of a lot easier and could make all the difference between having to advertise frequently and not having to advertise at all.

What Sets You Apart?

What’s your USP? Do you teach Dynamic Pilates group classes, purely classical, or do you focus more on private tuition? Is there anything that makes you really different to the rest? Maybe not, but if there is, then that could be a good selling point.

What’s Your Local Competition?

Sometimes competition is a good thing, but if you’re planning on opening a studio on a high street already saturated with established Pilates or other fitness studios, then you might be setting yourself up for unnecessary failure. Find out what other Pilates studios there are in your area and find out what kind of classes they teach, who their clientele are and how successful they are.

What’s Your Demographic?

Who are you aiming to target? This will depend on the style of pilates class you want teach, but ideally it should represent the majority of the locals. So, if you’re living in a quiet village where the average age is 85, then perhaps dynamic style Pilates may not go down so well! Get to know your area and the locals if you don’t already. This will also give you an idea of your pricing point.

Do The Math

Be as prepared as possible and start with a detailed business plan covering absolutely everything and every possible eventuality. (If you’re stuck on how to write a business plan you can get templates online) You won’t be able to give accurate figures of course, but do your best to estimate your potential earnings and show the worst case scenario as well as the best. You need to know that you will be able to cover yourself if things don’t go as well as hoped, which in the first few months may be the case.

What Is Realistic For You?

How many classes do you want to teach per day/week? Do you want to get other trainers to teach for you? How much can you afford to pay on rent. My top advice would be not over stretch yourself with huge outgoings, especially in the early days. Start small, build and establish your business/brand and then expand. The whole thing will be a much more enjoyable experience if the stress is minimized.

Good Luck!

How To Teach Pilates Group Classes 16 Sep

How To Teach Pilates Group Classes That Accommodate All Levels

How To Teach Pilates Group Classes That Accommodate All Levels

Structuring a class to accommodate all client abilities can be tough, probably one of the toughest things for a group instructor. However proper preparation and teaching skills can make any class run smoother.

As teachers we have all experienced those classes or lesson plans that “flopped”. They flopped because only 2 out of your 5 clients could properly perform the “Teaser” on the first try while you spent 15 minutes trying to get the other 3 clients up to speed.

During those 15 minutes the 2 clients that nailed it on the first try got bored and began to become impatient while waiting. So how do you avoid situations like this?

  • Briefly chat with your new clients before class starts to get a feel for their abilities and comfort level. I am not saying have a sit down interview but take a minute. Our studio requires new clients to arrive 10 minutes early to fill out paper work. This 1 minute chat allows me to quickly decide where I want to strategically place them in the studio. I try and put them on a reformer that has good visibility of me and next to experienced clients.
  • Teach in layers. Every “Flow” or sequence I teach progresses in difficulty. A “Flow” or sequence should consist of layers or variations. The first layer is easy, the second layer is moderately challenging and the third layer is very challenging. As we approach the second and third layers I give my clients options to stay with the current variation or continue onto the next variation for a greater challenge. The clients choosing to stick with the easier variations feel safe and comfortable while the more advanced clients are challenged with more challenging variations. Building blocks!
  • Know good modifications! Always, always have good modifications planned for every moderate to challenge exercise! Choose modifications that are simple and do not require lots of set up or lengthy explanations.
  • Keep your cueing simple to keep your class moving. Do not go on and on about a set up of a movement creating long pauses in the class flow. Clients hate this. Trust me, as a studio owner the # 1 complaint I hear from clients about other teachers is “the teacher takes too long to explain things”. Or “we stop too much during class so she can help the new clients”. Keep your cues and set up simple and do not let your corrections for other clients affect the class flow. This is so hard but with practice gets easy and smoother.

At my studio we do not level our classes. It’s just too hard to schedule.

Plus NO ONE ever signs up for the “beginner” classes. We do offer private instruction classes but I honestly feel a group environment can be more motivating for clients. In many cases clients improve faster in a group class environment because their class mates inspire and challenge them to try movements outside of their comfort zone.

How To Become a Pilates Teacher 9 Sep

How To Become a Pilates Teacher

Want to become a Pilates teacher? Whether you’re thinking of changing career or just starting out on your career path; Pilates trainer is a popular choice within the fitness industry that can suit so many, from dancers to those who found Pilates through injury.

DO YOUR RESEARCH

The variety in Pilates classes is HUGE and first of all you need to establish what kind of Pilates you’d like to teach. If you’ve not done so already, I would advise going to as many different style classes as possible; classical, rehabilitation, dynamic, equipment based etc. I would also try classes held in gyms as well as specialist studios and of course online classes. This will give you a well rounded view of what’s out there, what possibilities there are and what you do and don’t like. It’s important to find a style that resonates with you and that you are passionate about.

You can of course come and train at our studios! In the UK: https://www.powerpilatesuk.com/ and in the USA: https://www.studiocorepilatesut.com/

Here are some studios we like:

  1. https://epochfitness.co.uk/
  2. https://www.mycorestudios.com/
  3. https://www.heartcore.co.uk/

GET GOOD AT IT

Practice makes perfect and if you’re going to teach and be a GOOD teacher, then you should practice your craft so that you fully understand it and you can do it with your eyes shut! Clients want to train with trainers who are inspiring, motivational and who know their sh**t! Pilates can take a while to grasp, I took classes for three years during my dance training before deciding to train to become a teacher. I would say it was only in the last year, training with a teacher I was motivated by, that it actually ‘clicked’ with me.

CHOOSE A TRAINING PROGRAM

Choosing a training program really does of course depend on where you’re located and there are so many on offer. Be wary of courses that can be completed over a short space of time, a good teacher training program should take at least several months and sometimes a few years to complete.

Once you have your Pilates qualification, practice teaching the basics for a good few months/years (the longer the better) so you thoroughly understand the fundamentals and how people’s bodies (and brains!) work when you teach them. Learn to spot the common mistakes people make and how to correct them. THEN you can take your teaching in which ever direction you chose with those firm basics under your belt.

With regards to teaching ‘dynamic’ style reformer, there are no official qualifications (as far as we know) but a few dynamic studios offer in house training programs, all of which will have their prerequisites prior to signing up.

Above all, find the reason WHY you want to teach. Ask yourself, what do you get out of it personally? A great teacher must be passionate about their subject and love what they do. And remember, there’s more to being a good teacher than just teaching well. You will be working with the general public, so you need to be good at customer service, compassionate, caring, patient, accommodating, flexible (I’m not talking about being able to do the splits, although in this job it does also help ?!) You will also need to have a good business head, especially if you’re opening your own studio.

I (Korin) trained at Body Control Pilates who offer world wide training courses. You can check them out here https://www.bodycontrolpilates.com

To be continued…

RIALTO Reformer 2 Sep

Which Reformer Is Right For Me?

As a Pilates teacher (Tiffany here) I get asked all the time about what reformers are best to buy for home use or new studios. There are so many Reformers out there with so many benefits it can be hard to choose. Here are a few things to consider….

1. Body Size

Taller bodies….I am 5 feet 10 inches and I fit best on the Studio Reformer by Balanced Body. The carriage and frame size is a bit bigger then most. Plus the spring bar has multiple gear settings. Meaning it can adjust to accommodate the smallest of bodies to the tallest of bodies. Many other Reformers do not!!! I feel like a giant gorilla on Gratz and Peak Reformers. The Balanced Body Studio Reformer also come in a “Stretch” length with 6 extra inches on the frame. This is really nice tall bodies! I have had 3 of my Balanced Body Studio Reformers for about 10 years and they age nicely and the maintenance is fairly simple. For the money these are hands down the best choice if you are looking to buy a Reformer that will last forever and needs minimal maintenance.

If you are a smaller to average size individual the Allegro 2 by Balanced Body is pretty slick. I feel like a giant on this Reformer because the carriage is about 3 inches shorter then the Studio Reformer ?. However it is pretty cool. It feels a bit heavy to me but the moving foot bar is really fun and opens the door to more movement options. In my experience people either love or hate this Reformer. At first I was not a fan of the Allegro 2 but I think it was because I was comparing it to the Studio Reformer. The two Reformers are so different it’s really hard to compare. For me, I prefer the Studio over the Allegro but I know lots of people who feel differently.

2. Space

Do you have enough space for your reformer? If your space is limited and you want to be able to stack your equipment or push it under a bed look into a Stott Reformer. Korin has Stott Reformers in her studio and I really like them. Many studios in cities like London are limited size wise so it’s nice to have the option to stack your Reformers without losing quality.

Price

Balanced Body just came out with a less expensive Reformer model called the Rialto. It looks like the Studio Reformer but about 1/2 the price. They definitely cut a few corners and used materials that are less expensive to save on costs but people are liking this cheaper option. Definitely worth looking into. I probably would not buy this Reformer for a busy studio but I would definitely buy it for my home. If you like the Studio Reformer but not it’s $4,000 price tag, then checkout the Rialto.

If you have any questions about the 3 Reformers I have mentioned feel free to email us at hello@dynamicpilatestv.com. We are both always happy to answer any questions you might have.

RIALTO Reformer 2 Sep

Which Reformer Is Right For Me?

As a Pilates teacher (Tiffany here) I get asked all the time about what reformers are best to buy for home use or new studios. There are so many Reformers out there with so many benefits it can be hard to choose. Here are a few things to consider….

1. Body Size

Taller bodies….I am 5 feet 10 inches and I fit best on the Studio Reformer by Balanced Body. The carriage and frame size is a bit bigger then most. Plus the spring bar has multiple gear settings. Meaning it can adjust to accommodate the smallest of bodies to the tallest of bodies. Many other Reformers do not!!! I feel like a giant gorilla on Gratz and Peak Reformers. The Balanced Body Studio Reformer also come in a “Stretch” length with 6 extra inches on the frame. This is really nice tall bodies! I have had 3 of my Balanced Body Studio Reformers for about 10 years and they age nicely and the maintenance is fairly simple. For the money these are hands down the best choice if you are looking to buy a Reformer that will last forever and needs minimal maintenance.

If you are a smaller to average size individual the Allegro 2 by Balanced Body is pretty slick. I feel like a giant on this Reformer because the carriage is about 3 inches shorter then the Studio Reformer ?. However it is pretty cool. It feels a bit heavy to me but the moving foot bar is really fun and opens the door to more movement options. In my experience people either love or hate this Reformer. At first I was not a fan of the Allegro 2 but I think it was because I was comparing it to the Studio Reformer. The two Reformers are so different it’s really hard to compare. For me, I prefer the Studio over the Allegro but I know lots of people who feel differently.

2. Space

Do you have enough space for your reformer? If your space is limited and you want to be able to stack your equipment or push it under a bed look into a Stott Reformer. Korin has Stott Reformers in her studio and I really like them. Many studios in cities like London are limited size wise so it’s nice to have the option to stack your Reformers without losing quality.

Price

Balanced Body just came out with a less expensive Reformer model called the Rialto. It looks like the Studio Reformer but about 1/2 the price. They definitely cut a few corners and used materials that are less expensive to save on costs but people are liking this cheaper option. Definitely worth looking into. I probably would not buy this Reformer for a busy studio but I would definitely buy it for my home. If you like the Studio Reformer but not it’s $4,000 price tag, then checkout the Rialto.

If you have any questions about the 3 Reformers I have mentioned feel free to email us at hello@dynamicpilatestv.com. We are both always happy to answer any questions you might have.