What to expect at your first reformer Pilates class

What_to_expect_at_your_first_reformer_Pilates_class 10 Sep

What to expect at your first reformer Pilates class

If you’re thinking about taking a reformer Pilates class, but you’re not sure what to expect – you’ve come to the right place. The first time you take any new fitness class it can be slightly intimidating, but the good news is Dynamic Pilates TV classes are for everyone!

There are some misconceptions surrounding reformer Pilates, like needing to be ‘in shape’ and at a high fitness level, but this is not true. The Pilates philosophy is to build a strong core and then progress outwards.

What is reformer Pilates? 

To put it simply, reformer Pilates is Pilates performed on specialist equipment (the reformer), which allows for a more targeted and dynamic workout. Incredibly effective, Dynamic Pilates TV (DPTV) classes are a time-efficient full body workout, improving your strength, flexibility, posture and of course your mental health! 

It may help to know a few things before your first Pilates reformer class. We spoke with Pilates experts and Dynamic Pilates TV founders, Korin and Tiffany to get the rundown on what to expect at your first class. 

Five things you need to know before your first Pilates reformer class:

  1. Wear fitted clothing. 

Korin believes this is an important factor, she advises you wear tight fitted, comfortable clothing – such as lycra leggings and a fitted top. Korin explains, “this is not only for comfort and ease of movement, but to allow the instructor to see the shape and alignment of your body – in Pilates we focus on alignment, technique and posture – and all of these details need to be seen.” If you have a good instructor, you can expect the trainer to be correcting you, helping you stay aligned. 

For a better performance we recommend you invest in some anti-slip, gripped socks, such as Toe sox, for stability and for hygiene too. 

The editorial team at Stylist magazine have put together a roundup of the best sustainable and ethical brands to wear during your workout, and we quite like them too:  

  • Girlfriend Collective turn old plastic bottles and fishing nets into bras, leggings and shorts you’ll never want to throw away.
  • Manduka’s leggings are sourced from environmentally responsible materials.
  • Tala is an affordable, new brand made from plastic bottles.  
  • Silou is produced with dedication and care in sweatshop free production houses. 
  1. You will sweat! 

A lot! Especially if you’re taking a DPTV class. Tiffany explains, “as an intelligent workout, DPTV is choreographed to eliminate the start and stops you usually find in a fitness class, so your body is working longer – for a better overall workout.” 

Korin adds, “we like to think outside the Pilates box, DPTV has a contemporary feel as we blend exercises together; adding bosu balls, jumpboards, hand weights and resistance bands – making our classes a little bit different, keeping it fresh and fun!” 

Be sure to stay hydrated and have a towel handy.  

  1. This isn’t a mat class. 

The exercises that are taken from the mat to the reformer machine will seem more challenging. While the movements may be small and performed slowly – they’re controlled, to target specific muscle groups, many of which you may never work in your usual fitness routine. Reformer classes introduce a whole other element too, utilising the machine to add resistance and leverage to certain exercises. 

If you have a good instructor, they should be correcting you to improve your alignment technique – something to be aware of as this will probably differ from your usual mat classes. 

  1. When in doubt, slow down. 

Slow and steady wins the race. Tiffany recommends that “for the best results, concentrate on your form, not your speed. Considered, controlled movements target your muscles and provide the most gains for your efforts.” 

  1. You’ll be working your pelvic floor muscles. 

In Pilates we talk a lot about the pelvic floor and the importance of using these muscles. At DPTV we focus on supporting these deep abdominal muscles in every class. Korin explains that, “many people do not realise the importance of the pelvic muscle – these exercises are essential to maintain good posture and support the internal organs such as the bladder and uterus.” 

With a busy lifestyle, keeping your pelvic floor in tip-top shape doesn’t always come easy. In fact, according to the The Telegraph: “an estimated one in three women and one in 10 men have some sort of pelvic floor dysfunction.” 

The good news is that in many cases, this condition is treatable through exercise. Like any other muscle, your pelvic floor can be strengthened, but you need to be taught properly how to perform these exercises and engage your pelvic floor correctly – That’s where Dynamic Pilates TV comes in! This will benefit your workout and overall core strength considerably. 

 

Why DPTV is great for beginners 

As a DPTV member you will have access to weekly updated classes, ranging from 30 mins to one hour, as well as shorter ‘flows’ and fantastic beginner classes – providing you with plenty of options to make your first few classes a lot less daunting. 

If you’re a beginner to reformer Pilates and are thinking of joining DPTV but have some questions, feel free to contact Korin and Tiffany through our support page here or direct message our Instagram page here. 

Take advantage of the FREE 14 Day FREE Trial and explore our videos library & we look forward to welcoming you to your first DPTV class! 

If you liked this blog post you may be interested in reading more on the difference between classical and contemporary pilates here. 

 

Sources

L.Faye, Stylist Magazine, Sustainable and ethical activewear for your next workout

<https://www.stylist.co.uk/fashion/ethical-activewear-uk-women-swimwear-gym-clothes-yoga-eco-environmentally-friendly-sustainable-green/226744> 

September 2016, The Telegraph, Why looking after your pelvic muscles is just as important as a gym workout <https://www.telegraph.co.uk/wellbeing/pelvic-floor-dysfunction/importance-of-pelvic-floor-muscles/>